Veterinary Nursing

Trainee Vet Nurse Rhianna Dean helping prepare for surgery.

An incredibly rewarding job

ARTICLE BY: Jennifer Pelham, Ten Lives Head Vet Nurse

Being a veterinary nurse is an incredibly rewarding and exciting career. Due to its increasing popularity, gaining a position within the industry can be difficult. Having a nationally recognised qualification, a Certificate IV in Veterinary Nursing, helps individuals to gain a position in this competitive field.

There are numerous training providers that offer a Cert IV in veterinary nursing. The course is offered via distance education and provides training in practical and technical skills relevant to the care and nursing of animals. Students are required to be employed or to gain work placement within a veterinary clinic before beginning their certificate. A Cert IV is a big commitment for students (approx 2 years study and costing over $7,000) and without prior experience in the veterinary industry it can be hard to know if this is the career path for them. The Ten Lives vet team have been able to assist those interested in a career in Veterinary Nursing by offering volunteer vet nursing positions.

Ten Lives has an on-site Veterinary Surgery and Veterinary team, made up of experienced veterinarians and veterinary nurses dedicated to the care of cats within the shelter. The volunteer veterinary nurse position is designed to assist and support the veterinary team to carry out the surgical and medical procedures required for the cats in our care. The volunteer veterinary nurses duties are incredibly important during ‘kitten season’ which is the busiest time of the year for Ten Lives, where hundreds of cats come through the Centre each month.

Our veterinary team is small in comparison to most veterinary clinics. They operate in two teams; a surgical team and a shelter medicine team; both teams comprising of one veterinarian and one veterinary nurse. The small team size provides a unique one on one experience for volunteers wanting to gain an insight into the role and responsibilities of a qualified Veterinary Nurse. For those who are committed to begin a Cert IV in veterinary nursing the vet team sign up to be their workplace assessors’. This involves mentoring the students, providing them with practical work experience and assisting with their theoretical study requirements. They are trained and competent to undertake high standards of patient care and client advice.

We are delighted that so many of our veterinary nurse volunteers have completed their Cert IV at Ten Lives and have become nationally qualified Veterinary Nurses. Completing their Cert IV has helped them to gain employment as a Veterinary Nurse at Ten Lives and other veterinary clinics in the greater Hobart area. Training students is a highly rewarding experience for the vet team, who are pleased to share their knowledge and skills with passionate individuals to help them achieve their dream career.

Congratulations to Amber Schofield, Carla Ryan and Sam Griffiths for completing their Certificate IV in Veterinary Nursing and dedicating their careers to caring for animals.

“Ten Lives helped my confidence with cats and low stress handling grow. Everyone is so patient, knowledgeable and supportive. I couldn’t have finished my studies without them.” Carla said.

Amber agreed, adding “Doing my training at Ten Lives meant that I had one on one support and guidance which really helped my development and growth as a vet nurse. I learnt to be confident working with cats and was taught the value of low stress handling.”

We currently do not have any vacant positions for a volunteer veterinary nurse however letters of interest accompanied with resumes are welcomed and can be sent to info@tenlives.com.au.

“Ten Lives helped my confidence with cats and low stress handling grow. Everyone is so patient, knowledgeable and supportive. I couldn’t have finished my studies without them.” – Carla Ryan

Carla Ryan monitoring an anaesthetic.

“Doing my training at Ten Lives meant that I had one on one support and guidance which really helped my development and growth as a vet nurse. I learnt to be confident working with cats and was taught the value of low stress handling.”
– Amber Schofield

Amber Schofield assisting Dr Emma Flittner anaesthetise a cat.